Skyliner

Apr 04

Please bear with me and this current radio silence - I’m building a new website (whilst trying to teach myself exactly how to do such a tedious thing).
My next article is going to be an exploration of some underground bridges with photographer Andrew Brooks so hopefully it will launch on the new site within the next week.
There’s going to be much bigger photos (finally) and a calendar page for tours and events, and architecture and urban planning book reviews, it’s going to be a lot more work but I’ll also have an outlet for a separate blog page away from the main bulk of articles so I can update you with what exactly I get up to when I’m not writing articles, and going behind the scenes on research projects. 
Thanks for your patience. See you on the other side…

Please bear with me and this current radio silence - I’m building a new website (whilst trying to teach myself exactly how to do such a tedious thing).

My next article is going to be an exploration of some underground bridges with photographer Andrew Brooks so hopefully it will launch on the new site within the next week.

There’s going to be much bigger photos (finally) and a calendar page for tours and events, and architecture and urban planning book reviews, it’s going to be a lot more work but I’ll also have an outlet for a separate blog page away from the main bulk of articles so I can update you with what exactly I get up to when I’m not writing articles, and going behind the scenes on research projects. 

Thanks for your patience. See you on the other side…

Mar 17

[video]

Mar 01

This coming Tuesday 4th March I’m excited to meet my idol William Mitchell. Anyone who follows my blog will know there’s rarely a month goes by without a nod towards his post-war sculptures and reliefs so if like me you’ve marvelled at the 4 storey mural in the Mercure Hotel, the totem poles of Salford University or the CIS Tower’s ground floor mural then you’re in luck! Bill will be giving a talk at London’s RIBA at 6:30pm. Tickets are still available so I urge you to take the opportunity to hear him talk. 

"After working for the London County Council Architects Department, in the 1960s, adding decorative and sculptural panels to housing schemes at minimal cost, Bill Mitchell was sent (first class) around the world by the Cement and Concrete Association, promoting British Architecture and construction.
He ended up driving five thousand miles to Qatar in a motor home to build a zoo in the desert from sprayed cement on steel mesh, and contributed art works to San Francisco’s BARTD Rapid Transit, Railway. Here in the UK many of Bill’s works are now listed buildings. In this event, hosted by the Twentieth Century Society, Bill talks about his adventures and experiences at home and abroad. With introduction by Mike Althorpe - Curator of the Brits Who Built the Modern World - looking at early post war architectural exports.”

Please visit the Twentieth Century Society for booking details. 
[My own plans to visit have altered slightly so if anyone would like my return to Manchester from London on the Wednesday morning then contact me and you can have it!]

This coming Tuesday 4th March I’m excited to meet my idol William Mitchell. Anyone who follows my blog will know there’s rarely a month goes by without a nod towards his post-war sculptures and reliefs so if like me you’ve marvelled at the 4 storey mural in the Mercure Hotel, the totem poles of Salford University or the CIS Tower’s ground floor mural then you’re in luck! Bill will be giving a talk at London’s RIBA at 6:30pm. Tickets are still available so I urge you to take the opportunity to hear him talk. 

"After working for the London County Council Architects Department, in the 1960s, adding decorative and sculptural panels to housing schemes at minimal cost, Bill Mitchell was sent (first class) around the world by the Cement and Concrete Association, promoting British Architecture and construction.

He ended up driving five thousand miles to Qatar in a motor home to build a zoo in the desert from sprayed cement on steel mesh, and contributed art works to San Francisco’s BARTD Rapid Transit, Railway. Here in the UK many of Bill’s works are now listed buildings. In this event, hosted by the Twentieth Century Society, Bill talks about his adventures and experiences at home and abroad. With introduction by Mike Althorpe - Curator of the Brits Who Built the Modern World - looking at early post war architectural exports.”

Please visit the Twentieth Century Society for booking details. 

[My own plans to visit have altered slightly so if anyone would like my return to Manchester from London on the Wednesday morning then contact me and you can have it!]

Feb 17

Manchester Airport

image

Manchester Airport evokes great memories for me, not so much the flying away to a far off land, rather it makes me remember the air-fix models you could buy from duty free and of the plane spotters gathered together on the roof of the airport with their radios that tuned in to air traffic control. My dad wasn’t quite a plane spotter but we did have those models around the house and he did take me to loiter behind people who had those radios. I’m sure he would have liked a radio of his own someday but this stealth listening had two selling points, it was effortless and it was free.

image

In the summertime, as a child, the airport was our most popular haunt. We’d wander around the great lounge marvelling at those huge Venetian glass chandeliers that hung so majestically amidst the shops in the departure lounge.

The chandeliers weigh almost 2 tons each and were designed by royal architect Stefan Buzas, originally the chandeliers included pieces of coloured glass but during a cleanup to remove tobacco stains it was decided that the the design would be modernised by the removal of the coloured shards.

imageCirca 1963

image

(photo courtesy of Flickr user Pagan555) and taken from an earlier version of this article for my postcards blog Lost Touch.

The chandeliers were removed from the airport entirely in 2003, one is housed at St Helens World of Glass (here), a second is at MOSI but remains in storage to this day having never been displayed, and a third was purportedly used as part of Helen Maurer’s Light Landing piece at Tatton Biennial. Number four’s location is a mystery.

image

Once my dad and I had browsed the travel gadgets on sale and leafed through the albums in the music shop we’d head over to the runway. And it’s the runway that’s the reason for my visit today - to explore the old air traffic control tower with photographer Andrew Brooks.

image

imageThe new control tower, built to replace this one, was built in just nine days and opened last summer on the airport’s 75th anniversary, it was nominated for the Building of the Year by Greater Manchester Chamber of Commerce, but lost out to Number One Riverside in Rochdale.

Here in the original control tower there’s a palpable feeling of abandonment - some electronic displays are still lit up as if the last person to leave did so in a hurry,

Read More

Feb 05

BBC Radio Manchester Interview: FAQUES

This morning I was on Alan Beswick’s breakfast show on BBC Radio Manchester talking about little known facts of our buildings, and about my upcoming events for Manchester Histories Festival - Faques. 

You can listen to the breakfast show here:

I thought I’d also take the chance to quickly comment on a few of the unusual facts mentioned by callers in to the show - well, I was crowned BBC Radio Manchester’s Head of Quirk so it’s only right I fulfil the role  of quirk reporting…

Alan mentioned the houses on top of the Arndale Centre: 

True. This was Cromford Court and was indeed a housing estate on the rooftops. They were demolished in 2003. I wrote about the estate and have some fantastic archive images here

image

The Imperial War Museum is designed to look like an exploded hand grenade:

False. Not quite right but not a million miles from the truth. The building’s concept is the fragments of a shattered globe. Each fragment represent earth, air and water or land, sky and sea where battles are fought. This symbolism continues in the use of each fragment - the Earth segment is the openness and earthliness of the museum space, Air is the entrance to the museum, and Water is the canal viewing platform. 

There are little hillbilly men on a rooftop in Piccadilly

True. And I wrote about them in detail for one of my very first articles. They are Alpine style men and were quite damaged by the weather over the years but have been lovingly cleaned up. You can read about the little men of 79 Piccadilly here.

The Refuge Assurance building is made from smaller than average bricks

Well…I love this fact, and I they do look smaller so yes, I guess it is true but I don’t know much about brick sizing conventions. They were certainly specially commissioned to complement the terracotta decorations of the building so the size no doubt plays a part in that sympathetic design process. Have you ever looked closely at the facade of the building and the clock? You may well spot some interesting things when you do - castles, boats and insects are hidden throughout the building including an ark on the roof that’s not visible to anyone except the birds. 

There’s a train station underneath the Arndale centre

True. Indeed there is, underneath Topshop, though you shouldn’t get as carried away as to think of it as a complete station - it’s more of a cavity in the foundations that would have been a station if the Picc-Vic line went ahead. I talk a little of it in my fictional account of how Manchester might have been if architect Joseph Sunlight was head of city planning (here)

There’s a steam train underneath Victoria Station

False. The caller said that he’d seen this himself so I don’t want to doubt him but I’m positive it wasn’t there in the 70s when archivist Ken Howarth explored the tunnels, and it almost certainly isn’t there now during the renovations. I did some research and what I think the caller was referring to is the front end of a pacer cab that crashed into the buffers at Liverpool Lime Street. I’m not sure why it ended up under the station at Manchester and I have confirmation that it’s no longer there - there’s a photo of it in this article.

There was a graveyard under the station, and last summer you may have found yourself in a secret location, taken through a dark, man-made tunnel, and it may or may not have led you to a gig that was maybe held in the underground arches of the station which is normally used for storage of old furniture. Maybe. 

image

Toilet and catacombs under All Saints Park

True. Kind of. I actually don’t know about the toilets but it seems unlikely if they’re directly underneath the park because the catacombs the caller speaks of is a part truth - All Saints park is a mass grave for cholera victims (like many of Manchester’s parks) so it is consecrated ground and can’t be built on as a consequence. There’s a plaque to commemorate these burials at the park, on St Augustine’s church side of the park.

There are BT tunnels underneath Piccadilly Plaza

True. City Tower itself is an important site for the city - during the war Manchester made the decision to protect communications as a priority and as a consequence we have the Guardian tunnels (now owned by BT). The entrance to the tunnels is just over by China Town and they do indeed reach far out of the city, going as far as Ardwick and possibly beyond. City Tower hosts a variety of masts for communications so the tunnels leading here is no surprise. A further tunnel just behind the tower exists, or at least it did, and this was for the banks. There’s a photo of the bank tunnel on my article about City Tower here.

There was an underground swimming pool on Oxford Road.

True. It belonged to the Gaskell’s and much of it would have been underneath the former BBC building. You can read about it in our visit to the partly demolished BBC site from early in 2013

Alan also mentioned a little garden outside of a signal box in East Manchester, I don’t have a story on this one but I have seen it and can confirm its presence. 

Faques event details and booking can be found here, I will also be selling illustrated maps of all the locations closer to the time. 

Jan 24

Skyliner is on the look out for venues in Manchester city centre to take part in an installation in March 2014. We are looking for buildings that fit in with the Skyliner ethos of unusual architecture or history and owners who’d be happy for us to write on one of their windows. If you’d be interested in taking part in this event that will celebrate the history and architecture of the the city, or know someone who might, drop us an email for more details at: theskyliner.org@gmail.com
An illustrated map will be available to buy pinpointing the locations, and will be given away as part of the walking tours held on March 22 and March 29th.
More information to follow.

Skyliner is on the look out for venues in Manchester city centre to take part in an installation in March 2014. We are looking for buildings that fit in with the Skyliner ethos of unusual architecture or history and owners who’d be happy for us to write on one of their windows. 

If you’d be interested in taking part in this event that will celebrate the history and architecture of the the city, or know someone who might, drop us an email for more details at: theskyliner.org@gmail.com

An illustrated map will be available to buy pinpointing the locations, and will be given away as part of the walking tours held on March 22 and March 29th.

More information to follow.

Jan 22

Pomona Palace

image

As the Irwell acts as the invisible boundary between Salford and Manchester, Pomona is the limbo that buffers that waterway; it’s the tapering slice of land that makes way for the river to graze the Bridgewater Canal before both waterways abruptly branch off in opposing directions.

Once a bustling dockland and now a serene wasteland, Pomona, as small as it is manages to straddle Salford, Old Trafford and to a lesser extent Manchester (it takes mere minutes to reach from central Manchester on foot). These edgelands of Manchester are our alternative countryside.

image

image

image

Now owned by Peel with future plans to redevelop the area into apartments, the area has become one of interest to many people including botanists. It has been speculated that drastic steps have been taken to prevent the area from becoming listed as one of ecological importance, as noted by a resident in 2011:

“I jogged past this site this morning, and couldn’t believe what Peel had done to it!  The area had previously supported a lot of native shrubs and trees. Mountain ash, gorse, silver birch, etc were all growing there. I even picked wild apples from there last year, too. The site undoubtedly would have provided a lot of habitat for indigenous wildlife and it was great to see a bit of wilderness and biodiversity in what is a very built up area.

I know the site was ripe for development but Peel have obliterated any bit of greenery, whatsoever, and churned it into a muddy, sterile mess which looks more akin to the battlefields of WW1. In what is undoubtedly a “scorched earth policy” towards the site, I still have to ask was it really necessary to remove every single tree ,shrub and blade of grass? Even those mature trees which were growing right by the banks of the canal, and which wouldn’t have got in the way of their developments, got the chop.”

image

Read More

Jan 20

[video]

Jan 13

[video]

Jan 12

The ongoing Skyliner mission to credit the Spring Garden post office murals was featured in this Saturday’s Manchester Evening News. 
Will anyone find the answer…?

The ongoing Skyliner mission to credit the Spring Garden post office murals was featured in this Saturday’s Manchester Evening News

Will anyone find the answer…?

Oct 30

[video]

Oct 28

Theme Park Field Trip Part II

image

The tragic tale of Spreepark, Berlin.

Just visible from my hostel, along the river towards Treptower, a ferris wheel pokes above the trees. It’s hidden in the forests of Plänterwald, in the former GDR of Berlin and was part of a popular theme park for school children visiting from Eastern Bloc countries and originally called Kulturpark Plänterwald. Opened in 1969 it was sold twenty years later to Norbert Witte when it had closed with the falling of Berlin Wall. In 1991 it reopened as Spreepark, the sale to Witte also saw the park declared as a nature sanctuary. This declaration was partly what shut down the park some 10 years later when car parking for the venue was dramatically slashed in order to protect the woodland.

image

image

image

image

At the start of his tenure at Spreepark Witte purchased new rides from a closed amusement park in Paris called Mirapolis, these included the pirate ship, ferris wheel and the plaster dinosaurs which are left crumbling there today. By 2001, due to dwindling numbers, the park that once saw 1.5 million visitors a year, declared bankruptcy. 

image

image

image

In 2009 a documentary by the names of Achterbahn (Rollercoaster) was made by directory Peter Dörfler, the story focussed on the bankruptcy and the measures the Witte’s went to to claw back their fortune and get out of debt. The Witte’s soon travelled to Lima, Peru and took with them six rides so that they could eventually open a new park - Lunapark. The city of Berlin were not particularly enamoured with this move as the Wittes left not only a decaying park but also their multi-million debt.

image

Read More

[video]

Oct 24

[video]

St Ann’s Secret

image

At the heart of St Ann’s Square stands the only surviving 18th century church in the city (celebrating 300 years in 2012) and the second oldest in Manchester, the tower of which is said to mark the geographical centre of the old city and the surveyor’s benchmark can be seen carved into the stone by the tower door.

And the church has a secret hiding in its safe. 

image

The church was built in 1712 as part of a redevelopment of the area and is said to be designed by Christopher Wren, or one of his pupils, and was later restored by Alfred Waterhouse. At the time of erection the tower, though not seemingly large today, was visible all across Manchester - at which time was a small market town. 

One of the windows of the church is dedicated to the memory of Hilda Collens who founded the Northern School of Music (part of today’s Royal Northern College of Music).

Thomas De Quincey, born just around the corner on Cross Street, was baptised at the church and you can see the gravestones of his immediate family right outside. De Quincy wrote what is thought to be the very first book about drug addiction; Confessions of an English Opium Eater, and indeed he had quite the addictive personality - taking his opium dissolved in alcohol and stating “I am bound to confess that I have indulged in it to an excess, not yet recorded of any other man”. Addiction literature was born. 

During the air raids of the Second World War churches would often fall victim to the blasts, yet St Ann’s seemed to be lucky enough not to be targeted. Or at least that seemed to be the case until 1960, because St Ann’s has a secret and that secret is hiding in its safe.

A bomb.

In 1960, during repair works to the church, an unexploded bomb was found on the roof and since then the bomb has been locked away in a safe in the church.

image

image

image

Whilst I was in the church an elderly man named Ronnie came over to talk to me about the bomb, he remembered in the 70s when Cannon Morgan was on loan to St Ann’s from the cathedral. Ronnie alluded to a playful rivalry between the cathedral and St Ann’s and he’d asked Cannon Morgan what he thought of the bomb landing but not detonating: “do you think it’s because we’re such good anglicans here at St Ann’s?” to which the cannon replied: "perhaps, or alternatively it’s because the devil knows his own".

St Ann’s was once again lucky to escape further bomb damage, during the 1996 IRA bomb the upstairs windows were blown in on both sides of the church. The quite lovely stained glass windows were not damaged. 

When I set out to see the bomb today my roll of film became, quite coincidentally, something of a triptych of bomb scenes.

I left St Ann’s and decided to head over to Hilton House on Dale Street

Read More